The Odd Post

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Well, the last couple of months have flown by and the next, and last, couple of months at home will no doubt fly by as well.

I officially land in India 2 months today (22nd November) and though it seems like a long time off, it’ll fly by in no time, mainly because I’m so busy leading up to it; my 25th birthday is coming up, followed by Christmas, then New Years Eve spent in Edinburgh. In between all of this I’ve got things to buy, vaccination and consultant appointments, route planning, and various bookings of one thing or another in preparation for next year. I’ve never been as busy but it’s all finally happening, and this is how it looks:  Read More…


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We all have our own story as to how and why we choose to travel. Some people are more than happy travelling a few times a year while keeping a steady job back home, others feel that it’s something they’ve go to get out of their system, and there are those who just want to fling themselves across the globe and see where they end up. Which type of traveller are you? Have you quit your job or can you work whilst travelling?

The first thing I did after I decided to travel full time was to start reading more travel blogs. This lead me to ask myself some questions:

What are the pro’s and con’s of travelling full time?
Am I really going to travel solo?
What will my family think? (More importantly what will my sister think?)
Do I have the guts to actually do it?

After answering these questions and starting to plan when to leave and where to go, Read More ….


Welcome!

Last year I decided to fulfil a dream and travel solo to a country I’d often dreamt of going to: Iceland. I’ve always wanted to travel the world, whether alone or not, and I knew that I needed to test the water a little bit in terms of actually doing it. Iceland isn’t particularly far away, nor is it the most outlandish in terms of culture, but it was somewhere that I had a feeling I’d really enjoy and it seemed the perfect time for me to leave the UK and see if I could get by in a foreign country.

Of course a lot of this ‘getting by’ is to do with having Type 1 Diabetes. When you’re around people, even people who don’t fully understand it, you’re constantly reminded to check your blood sugar or asked if you should be eating certain foods. Although this is quite annoying (as I’m sure most diabetics will agree) it does keep you somewhat grounded. I knew when travelling solo that unless I told anyone I was diabetic, or someone saw me injecting myself, no one would have a clue. The problem with this is that if something were to happen to me no one would know what to do. Read More